People having wrong philosophies is one thing, but worse than that is when people have a deeply-held idea about philosophy itself that prevents them from finding or being shown the truth.

Philosophy is the field of belief about how consciousness works. (This definition does encompass metaphysics and ethics.)
Science is the field of belief about how the universe works.
Math is the field of belief about things that are necessarily true, but don't directly concern consciousness.

Philosophy has two charactistics following from being about consciousness, which everyone has: it's accessible to everyone, and it's important for everyone.

When people talk about philosophy as if it's some kind of academic discipline that you have to "study" and that you can't be expected to engage in if you're not "educated", they're demonstrating a complete lack of understanding or appreciation of what philosophy is. This is a very dangerous and destructive attitude. One must do philosophy in order to understand what good and evil are, how humans work and thus how to interact with them, how thought works and thus how to use it more effectively, or anything else that's supremely important for every person to know. If you don't think those things are worth understanding, there's something wrong with you.

Similarly, there's the omnipresent idea that something other than philosophy is able to trump it. This crops up whenever someone responds to my a priori arguments about the nature of consciousness with "But it's been scientifically proven!" It doesn't matter what other evidence you have; if there's a logical contradiction in a belief or if it goes against the directly experienced nature of the human mind then you know it's false, period. You might as well say it's been scientifically proven that there's a number that doesn't equal itself, or that humans really only have two emotions and there's no difference between sorrow and anger.

The definition of a philosopher is someone who does not think of philosophy this way. Someone who cares to seek understanding of what is universal and universally important.



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